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Michelle G
Michelle G
1/7/2017 1:43:43 PM
User Rank
IoT Visionary
Re: All the same
@Joe Young you had it really rough ;) You're probably doing a lot better than local real estate agents. They have an attachment to fax machines even today. The last three years or so they finally started to move to paperless signing even though it was available long before.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
1/5/2017 2:53:38 PM
User Rank
IoT Visionary
Re: All the same
There are quite a few (and a few of them embedded within Google Docs).  It is not as "vibrant"--but still quite cool to take advantage of.    

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
1/5/2017 2:52:26 PM
User Rank
IoT Visionary
Re: All the same
Hmm. Thankfully, I haven't needed to fax anything government-related. However, maybe I'm doing it wrong and going to govt offices in person? 

I'm also surprised that there aren't more e-fax services.. where you can simply email or scan and upload images -- and the service will fax it for you? I think there are some services that do this.. but I also think they're all owned by the same underlying company that monopolizes the e-fax market.

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mpouraryan
mpouraryan
1/4/2017 9:50:03 PM
User Rank
IoT Visionary
Re: All the same
The only place that seems to embrace and appreciate Faxes is Government.   We have more crucial things to be concerned about--I am just as amused about fax machines as well--as @Ariella noted, phones could--now there are free sites off your computer you could fax.    Interesting times we live in--especially as we're witness to the alternative reality otherwise known as #CES2017.

 

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mhhf1ve
mhhf1ve
1/4/2017 7:44:31 PM
User Rank
IoT Visionary
Re: All the same
The continued existence of fax machines baffles me a bit.. I understand the network effect of them keeps them somewhat useful, but with ubiquitous email access and email attachments? What is the purpose of faxing, other than to annoy people now? 

The last time I had to fax something was when I had to submit an insurance claim, and there was literally no other acceptable way to submit the required form. I think it was purposely set up this way to delay insurance claims. Fax your forms into a black hole, wait, call, find out they didn't process your fax for some reason, repeat until you get fed up. 

It's like customer service call centers that put you on hold.. and then just hang up on you after X minutes. 

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Ariella
Ariella
1/4/2017 1:53:36 PM
User Rank
IoT Visionary
Re: All the same
One of my earlier printers was capable of faxing, though I didn't keep a dedicated phone line for it. Now even the major company where my husband works has taken away all the fax machines, and all faxes have to be done as scans.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
1/4/2017 1:11:46 AM
User Rank
IoT Mover & Shaker
Re: All the same
@Michelle: I remember when I was first starting my practice and was fretting because I couldn't afford a fax machine or dedicated line.

Now I think that's just adorable that I felt that way.  On the exceedingly rare occasions I need to fax something, I can manage just fine by bumming somebody else's -- or, worst-case scenario, by going to FedEx Office (nee Kinko's).

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
1/4/2017 1:09:55 AM
User Rank
IoT Mover & Shaker
Re: All the same
Preach, @j0nny.  I've been saying for years that, isntead of relying on GUIs, people need to learn how to code (link) and that the biometric revolution stands to make us less safe and less secure (link).

An old bromide goes: "Would you rather be safe or would you rather be free?"

A similar one could be coined along the lines of safety/security/privacy/freedom vs. convenience.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
1/4/2017 1:05:28 AM
User Rank
IoT Mover & Shaker
Re: All the same
@dcawrey: And, more to the point, are they doing efficacious, profitable things with it?

On Facebook, I see all kinds of ads for woodworking courses (not interested), motorcycle repair courses (not interested), and a business of which I am already a committed long-term customer.

So they may have my data, but they sure as heck don't know what to do with it.

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli
1/3/2017 3:52:00 PM
User Rank
IoT Mover & Shaker
Re: All the same
@faryl: The argument has been compellingly made that we are already at the point where data = commodity.

It's all about the systems and the connectivity now (esp. via IoT technology).  Data represents a commodity of almost utility proportions.  You collect the data and then either need to throw it all away or pay more money to store it (likely for negative ROI).

We're no longer in the "Information Age" and are instead in the "Systems Age."  As such, it is the systems and the connectivity that are more important -- allowing us access to the commoditized data we desire near instantaneously.  Effectively, with IoT and the cloud, collecting and storing data over the long haul is now for chumps.  ;)

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