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linkedin67228
linkedin67228
1/6/2017 6:45:16 AM
User Rank
IoT Novice
Exciting
I would like to  see this smart technology.Now I use device as tracking blood pressure & heart rate to compare. It is really cool. I can show results my doctor . Or I can checked my heart rate. I found some apps for doctors https://itechcraft.com/custom-healthcare-solutions/ . What do you think about this apps. 

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Ariella
Ariella
11/10/2016 12:45:14 PM
User Rank
IoT Visionary
Re: Exciting advancements
@vnewman I have a dermatologist like that, too. He still records his notes  while the patient is there. In contrast, almost all other doctors and dentists I see now type into a computer. He will diagnose based on observation alone, though he has also scraped off a sample just to be sure. I suppose that is playing it safe for things that look like one thing but could, maybe, possibly be something else. But he has also left certain moles alone with a certainty that they are safe even without sampling. 

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vnewman
vnewman
11/4/2016 4:11:28 PM
User Rank
IoT Mover & Shaker
Re: Exciting advancements
I see technology like this as a value-add, but see the downside as doctors relying on this technology too much and using as a crutch.  It's like anything else - the use of spell check tends makes you a worse speller, the use of a calculator can kill off your math skills (or Maths, however you like to term it).

I have a very old dermatologist who I refuse to give up because he's seen most everything - he looks at a spot and just knows.  You can can't really replace that knowledge and experience inside someone's head.  But that information was gathered, for the most part of his career with observation and cultivating instinct - which I fear will die off a bit in the advent of this.

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Ariella
Ariella
11/4/2016 10:58:13 AM
User Rank
IoT Visionary
Re: Exciting advancements
@Michelle I was very unimpressed by my last checkup. I mean it's nice in some ways to have the doctor leave you fully clothed. But it also meant that she was relying completely on the numbers rather than her own observation. My brother-in-law's father was a doctor, and he recalled that he was known to be a good diagnostician, meaning he would be able to assess based on his own observation. That seems to no longer exist. In part it's because doctors want to prove they're following best practices for the numbers that the labs yield. It appears a lot more objective. This is not a universal practice, though.

I recently interviewed someone from the British Medical Journal who said that practices vary around the globe. In the UK, they are not as quick to order labs because of the expense that has to be borne by NHS. Also there everything is filtered through the GP who serves adults as well as children in the area.

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Michelle G
Michelle G
11/3/2016 1:34:19 PM
User Rank
IoT Visionary
Re: Exciting advancements
@Ariella I must have had a very different experience. I tend to see doctors who listen to symptoms and look at blood work together. I think they order too many lab tests each time, but generally seem to pay attention to all data points (not just blood work results).

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DHagar
DHagar
11/2/2016 5:18:26 PM
User Rank
IoT Visionary
Re: Exciting advancements
@Ariella, great example and good information!

As with everything, it can add a dimension of access/quality care if placed properly in the healthcare system.  With the report of medical errors in the current system (typically 20% +), this would make a solid contribution to our trust in our diagnostics and care.

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Ariella
Ariella
11/2/2016 5:01:54 PM
User Rank
IoT Visionary
Re: Exciting advancements
@DHagar That could well be. Medicine used to rely primarily on bleeding patients, and we now regard that as primitive. What we do today is likely going to be regarded as primitive by future generations.

But we are also making very impressive advances. I just read about this: https://news.wsu.edu/2016/10/18/wsu-portable-smartphone-laboratory-detects-cancer/

The WSU research team created an eight channel smartphone spectrometer that can detect human interleukin-6 (IL-6), a known biomarker for lung, prostate, liver, breast and epithelial cancers. A spectrometer analyzes the amount and type of chemicals in a sample by measuring the light spectrum.

Although smartphone spectrometers exist, they only monitor or measure a single sample at a time, making them inefficient for real world applications. Li's multichannel spectrometer can measure up to eight different samples at once using a common test called ELISA, or colorimetric test enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, that identifies antibodies and color change as disease markers.

In tests, it has proven 99% accurate.

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DHagar
DHagar
11/2/2016 2:53:44 PM
User Rank
IoT Visionary
Re: Exciting advancements
@Ariella, I am with you on that!  It definitely will cut down on infection control.  But actually the entire concept of telemedicine is appealing in having timely access, and personalized, to information/education, test results, and consultations.  I believe some day we will look back on wonder how we delivered healthcare without it.

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Ariella
Ariella
11/2/2016 2:28:40 PM
User Rank
IoT Visionary
Re: Exciting advancements
@Michelle maybe you've had better experiences with doctors than I've had. The ones I've come across operate very much by rote,t hat is going by the numbers. In other words, they don't really diagnose much by what they see -- except for conjunctivitis. Otherwise, it's a ll a matter of seeing the numbers for the blood work, blood pressure, weight, and how it compares with last time. For that approach, a computer would actually be more accurate. If doctors did think more out of the box and not just keep prescribing tests (that can easily add hundreds of dollars onto a visit because each test generates its own bill) then I'd think there's no substitute for a person. But because of the way they approach diagnosis, I really think you don't need a person at all -- just a machine that takes the standard readings, puts in whatever cultures are relevant, and spits back the numbers with the standard recommendation that goes with them.

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Ariella
Ariella
11/2/2016 2:24:45 PM
User Rank
IoT Visionary
Re: Exciting advancements
@DHagar Yes, telemedicing is not just more economical but the only way medical care can reach certain populations. Even I would be happy to video conference rather than have to wait in a waiting room (often for an hour)  where I'd likely be exposed to germs that may make me sick.

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